Winter Capsule Wardrobe For The Work From Home Mama.

Season’s greetings ya’ll!

What a whirlwind of the past few months! In the last 6 months we’ve purchased our first home, moved, I’ve started my own childcare business and my maternal grandma recently passed away. The passing of my grandma has been a tough one emotionally these past few weeks as I live very far away from all of my immediate family. But I’m working through it and trying to process as each day comes.

I figured it was time to share my Winter Capsule Wardrobe! This time of year is always a toss up when it comes to weather where I live. In the past 5 years I’ve learned to be prepared for anything from ice, snow, rain and really mild days. My wardrobe stays pretty consistent from October until May every year but I definitely add some warmer layers come the winter months. I’m using the Urstyle and ShopLookIO website to create all of what I share in this blog post.

I don’t own the exact pieces I’m sharing but rather I choose items similar to what I own. This time of year I like functional, warm and comfy clothing not only because of the weather but because I take care of 3 babies/toddlers on a daily basis.

This will give you an idea of what I have hanging in my closet. I have about 7-9 tops I rotate through each week. I own more than 9 but consistently wear 9 of the same pieces. This year I’ve been loving turtlenecks, cowl necks and poncho type sweaters. Turtlenecks save me from having to put on a scarf when I go outside and provide extra warmth.

I know I’ve talked about it before but I don’t wear regular pants because ain’t nobody got time for that! I used to reside in the camp of, “Leggings are not pants.” Since I’ve had children and experienced an ever changing body, I’ve joined camp “LEGGINGS ARE LIFE.” I mean seriously, thank you Lord for whoever created spandex.

I do own a few pairs of jeans and overalls that occasionally make an appearance. But if I can help it, I’ll opt for more comfortable pants.

I keep shoes and outerwear pretty simple and practical. Heels and flimsy coats don’t really cut it when it’s an ice storm and -27 degrees out. Usually -27 means I’m staying INSIDE with a cup of hot coffee and warm slippers on.

My everyday “style” probably isn’t much of style because I’m home 95% of the time. But the rare time I go out on a date with my husband or we make it to church, I like to dress things up a bit. I had a little fun creating some outfits I would typically put together for those occasions!


Definitely check out the Urstyle and ShopLookIO websites if you enjoy putting together outfits for inspiration. I love utilizing what I have in my closet as well as thrifting to come up with some cute and comfy styles for the winter season. Winter can be a difficult season for me personally as it can be for many people. The combination of feeling stuck inside, lack of sunshine and long winter months can contribute to depression and/or anxiety. While it may seem like a little thing, putting together things I enjoy wearing can help combat those feelings during this season. Instead of just staying in my pj’s, I’m more motivated if I get up and put something on that I love wearing!

What’s winter like where you live? I’d love to see/hear about some of your winter style in the comment section below! Thanks for stopping by!

A Spring Capsule Wardrobe (For Stay At Home Moms)

Leggings. Are they pants? Are they sleepwear? Are they athletic wear?

I used to swim in the pool of people who considered leggings in the NON pants category. Then I had babies and leggings are now my best friend forever!

I’m a little excited today to share a post that veers off a bit from the mom and baby type things I typically write about.

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First things first. What the heck is a capsule wardrobe? I’m going to be really lazy today and give you MY definition of a capsule wardrobe. Basically it’s a minimal number of multi-functional clothing items, accessories and shoes. The idea is to have less items and items that are versatile, thereby giving you more ways to wear those items. If you are into the minimalist lifestyle or it’s something you are pursuing, a capsule wardrobe is going to help you get there. I’m not saying what I have here is an EXACT capsule wardrobe but I think it holds some of the concept.

I’m no fashionista by any means. My style over the years has evolved into neutral colours and functional pieces. Comfort is my highest priority.

I live in Canada where the weather is snowy, wet, rainy and cold the majority of the year. We have a few brief months of summer and a beautiful (sometimes wet and cold) fall season. When I moved here from Southern California I had this super impractical wardrobe that I had to slowly replace. Cheap plastic boots don’t cut it during the winter. I’m also not the kind of person that can wear flats or go without socks once the weather turns cold.

Location, weather and day to day activities are things you have to keep in mind when you are building seasonal capsule wardrobes. What is practical for me now is completely different than when I was working in an office setting. Heels????? No, I think not. Anyways, lets jump in!


I have about 6 different shirts and sweaters that I wear in rotation throughout the week. As you can see in the picture to the left they are mostly neutral in colour and comfortable material.

I stick with a few soft, flowy tops in cream colours if I feel like dressing things up. A neutral cardigan (or a few) is a staple! White and mom life? It can work! Just basically don’t be around your children the whole day, right?

A basic denim jacket is your best friend FOREVER. It’s so versatile! You can wear it with dresses, tank tops, t-shirts, etc. I’ve had mine for 5 years now. I also keep a light, loose denim button up to layer under sweaters for a different look. A neutral, cropped blazer can be paired with a nicer top for a dressier look.

So, I basically would be walking around pants-less if leggings didn’t exist. Nicole Miller or Talula are my favourite brands for leggings. Talula is pricey and I’ve only scored them second hand. I go for a dark wash and a light wash to keep it simple with jeans. Old Navy’s Rockstar stretch (or whatever they are called) are a mom’s BFF. But your best bang for your buck will be second hand where you can find really great brands for a fraction of the cost. I have about 5 pairs of leggings and 3 pairs of jeans in rotation.

I think most Canadians can agree with me when I say you can not have too many jackets and coats. My husband has more than me! The weather here is unpredictable so even when we put away our winter gear, we still have up to 5 pieces of outerwear each in our front closet. I typically wear 3 out of those five. I think a military green utility jacket is super versatile. Given our rainy spring here in Ontario, I like having a raincoat that I can layer under and to finish things off, I keep a faux leather blazer for dressier times.

Before I became a mom I had multiple purses. While I still have 3 simple purses, what I carry on a regular basis is far more functional. Both of these backpacks are from Amazon and under $50. This grey backpack is an actual diaper bag. It’s also the same diaper bag that every mom friend of mine has, in the same exact colour. The faux leather backpack functions as a diaper bag and while it says it’s a diaper bag, it’s a bit different from the other one.

Shoes are something I believe are worth investing in. I found out the hard way, when I first moved here that cheap boots and sandals were a waste of money. My Blundstones and Timberlands are my favourite shoes for early spring and fall. During the summer Birkenstocks are my go to! Call me an old lady but I scored these Naturalizers on sale and I love that they are slip ons! It makes mom life that much easier.

When it comes to accessories, I’m pretty simple. I wear a wedding ring and sometimes simple earrings. If I’m feeling really extra, I’ll put a watch on. If you catch me between the months of October and April, I’ll have a scarf on.

Of course, I own more clothing than this because where I live has 4 distinct seasons. I rotate pieces in and out of storage. Spring and Fall are tricky seasons because the weather is unpredictable. Temperatures can fluctuate. I remember one spring where it was warm enough to be in shorts and get a tan. Two weeks later it snowed! For those reasons, my wardrobe has to be versatile and functional.

An example of an everyday outfit for me right now-wallet and sunnies if I’m running errands without babies!

When I started minimizing my wardrobe and choosing things that were practical, I found it so much easier to get dressed in the mornings. If you feel really overwhelmed by simplifying what you have, just start with the pieces you reach for the most often. Donate what you no longer wear. When you need “new” pieces shop second hand.

I share a few tips here about buying second hand.

Have you ever put together a capsule wardrobe? What are some must have pieces for you? I’d love to hear from you in the comments below.

How I’m Learning To Live With Less And Why I didn’t Always Love it.

I could feel the sweat starting to bead on my forehead and my heart began to race. My palms felt sweaty and my chest tightened. What was sending me into full panic mode, you ask? Well. I was creating my baby registry. 

Most normal mamas to be would probably feel excited doing this but for me, I found it overwhelming. You see-our society seems to think that babies need everything under the sun in order to function once they slide out of the womb. It’s a falsehood I tell you! FALSE. I plan to write a blog post on a minimalist baby registry and the things we have found essential in these first months of baby boy’s life. Also-I felt this way with my wedding registry. We tried to keep it simple and I really appreciated my very practical mother in law being with us when we registered.

chaos-227971_640I think our journey into pursuing a simple, less is more lifestyle was something that evolved. Our first year of marriage we lived in a shoebox. It was what we could afford. I think it was less than 400 square feet. I could be wrong but it was TINY. We loved it and to this day it remains as my favourite place we have ever lived. We hit a bump in the road when we moved into a 3 level town home. We filled that townhouse with so much stuff.We found ourselves in an awful position when our land lord suddenly needed her home back, ASAP. We moved  within 2 weeks and downsized to our current place but it was one of the most stressful times of my life. We had accumulated so many useless things that much of which ended up on the curb for the junk guy to pick up. (not our home in the picture above)

Fast forward to the present. I went on a rollercoaster ride in the last year or so of emotions. I struggled with feeling ashamed of where we live, in a small basement apartment we rent in a very modest brick home. I wrestled with the comparison game, seeing how most of my close friends lived in these beautiful homes. I didn’t want to invite anyone over and I certainly wasn’t proud of my home. When we shared that we were pregnant a few people immediately asked us if it was planned,  followed by the question of when we were going to purchase a home. Talk about insult to injury. I doubt people meant to make me feel this way but I felt so inadequate. It made me feel like we were irresponsible for starting a family because we didn’t have everything set up the way society pressures us to. I felt like I had to apologize for our home the rare times people would come over. Instead of being grateful, I had really lost sight of what was truly important and valuable. I needed a good kick in the bum from one of my favourite writers-Matt Walsh. He writes a great article on the statistics of young people, money and having a family in today’s world. He says,

“I’m talking about people who harbor the faulty but common belief that marriage and parenthood should be the culmination of young adulthood, rather than the cornerstone of it. What my generation has decided it “needs” is to live a luxurious, fashionable, Instagramable life. And it’s too bad for them. They’re missing out. I thank God for my unfashionable childhood. I wouldn’t trade our humble family vacations in our Astro passenger van with duct tape on the door for a thousand swanky trips to Disney World. The sacrifice and simplicity ‘builds character,’ my Dad used to say, and you know something? He was right.”

Read the full article here.

I will share more about my struggle in moment but let me share some of the reasons why we are pursuing a lifestyle of having less things:

  1. Space. While we have a large garage that we share with the tenants upstairs, within our actual living space we don’t have much storage. I don’t have a linen closet or pantry, our closets are small but functional and there is no extra storage in the bathroom apart from under the sink. My living room is very small so there isn’t much extra space for lots of baby toys and I love this. Lack of space has made us be very intentional about what we purchase for our home.
  2. Money.canadian-money-in-bank_925x  The cost of living here is very high. I’m a stay at home mom so we live on one income. (That is the situation we agreed on so I could be at home with our son) My husband manages our money well and this is a blessing. We have to be intentional and practical about what we purchase so that we see our money go a long way. It’s decisions as simple as, do I get my hair done this month? Or do we invest in a new vacuum that we’ve been needing? That might seem silly or even sad to you but trust me, it’s ok! I’m not sad about these things anymore. I’m realistic about what I can afford, reguardless of how that fits into society’s standards of living.
  3. STRESS. Seriously. I have felt my stress level sky-rocket as stuff accumulates around my home.  Did you know that clutter and excess stuff actually affects our brain function?!  A 2009 study published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin found that women who described their households as “cluttered” exhibited increased fatigue and depression with correlating high cortisol levels, and a research project by UCLA in 2012 saw a similar link. Cortisol is bad news for healthy brain activity, as heightened levels of the hormone can cause lasting negative changes in brain function and structure.” Bad news.
  4. Because we love learning new skills that help us save money. We cloth diaper 90% of the time. Most of our clothing is second-hand (you read my post on buying second-hand clothing here) and we make most of our home decor. We’ve learned to garden and my husband’s family has taught us how to can. Our dehydrator has been a great tool in the kitchen. My husband goes hunting up north with his family, when he has the time. He’s literally bringing home the bacon (well more like bear meat which I haven’t learned to cook yet) so we have free meat to eat.  These are just some of the many frugal ways we’ve learned to save money. You can read more about that here.
  5. We have financial obligations. I won’t get into the nitty-gritty details of this but everyone has financial obligations and it looks different for every person. We don’t want to be bound by these things in the years to come so we are trying our best to be responsible now so we can have a debt free future.

Earlier I talked about feelings of shame and inadequacy with our current living space. It literally robbed me of joy, contentment, peace and made me jealous of others. I’ve needed a major attitude adjustment. Comparison really is the thief of joy. (Teddy Roosevelt)  I am working on my gratitude and learning to love our family’s approach to life. You know what is so ridiculous? I live in such a nice place! The kitchen was brand new when we moved in and our landlords remodeled our bathroom last summer. It’s gorgeous! All that to say, there are standards of living in the world today that just aren’t realistic or wise. There can be really negative consequences of wanting to have it all or what someone else has. While we are nowhere near perfecting our simple way of life, we are learning how to invest our time, energy and money in the things we feel are worth it for us.  These ideals are things we value and want to pass on to our son as he grows up.

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Please don’t misunderstand me, in this. Living with less doesn’t make my family and I better than everyone else. We are learning some great things living this simple life. Having an abundance of things and money doesn’t make a person wrong, either. As long as we know what is important at the end of the day.

“Love people, use things. The opposite never works.”-The Minimalists

Do you take a less is more-minimalist approach to life? Or maybe you hate the less is more approach? I hope you were able to glean some useful information from this post and I’d love to hear from you in the comments below!

*A great resource on living a minimalist approach to life are these guys, Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus, The Minimalists. They have written books and have a wonderful documentary out. Check out the trailer below.

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11 Ways We Save Money and Practice Being Frugal

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In Today I’m going to share the ways in which my husband and I save money. This saving money thing has never been a strong point for me, personally. Thankfully I married someone who is much better at it than me! I’ve taught my husband that it’s ok to splurge sometimes and he’s taught me that I don’t need the things I sometimes want. Learning to live frugally and simply has been an adventure for us. At this point in our marriage, we enjoy finding new ways to be frugal. We love to think of ways we can be self-sufficient.

Food

Limiting Eating Out: We don’t eat out often and we enjoy it so much more when we do go out for dinner or order a pizza. It’s special! This leaves us more to spend on groceries. Think about this, that the average cost for two people to eat dinner out is around $50. If you are buying lunch every day during the work week that is easily $50. This all adds up fast! When we were both bringing in an income, I bought lunch multiple times a week and we ate dinner out frequently. We actually saw a savings in this area when I quit my job outside the home. It goes to show how much more food you get for your money when you eat at home. It’s not easy and ask my husband, I LOVE TO EAT OUT. But we see savings when we practice frugality in this area.

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Growing A Garden: We fell in love with growing our own produce the first year of our marriage. Both of my husband’s grandfathers were farmers. It’s in his blood and he is so dang good at growing things. I like to organize what we will grow but he does most of the gardening. We’ve had a garden 2 years out of the 3 we’ve been married. It’s so easy to do and having fresh produce is so wonderful. Our growing season isn’t very long here so we take advantage of it. We see most of our savings with this in the summer and fall because of harvest.

Canning and deydrating foods are great ways to save money. Buying dehydrated fruit is costly and while it might take time to do some of these things, you can see some savings.


Buying Bulk: I love Costco but not everything is worth buying there. Right now the things that we find are most cost-effective to buy from Costco are diapers (they last forever since we are only using them at night), formula (it’s just as good as the fancy stuff in stores) toilet paper, paper towels and my husbands shampoo/body wash.

Sticking To The Grocery List and Limiting Grocery Store Trips: I’m not always good at this but when I manage to only get what I put on my list, I stay on budget. I’ve also found that multiple little trips to the grocery store add up quickly. Sometimes that means going without something until our next planned trip. This can be a great way to save. What we spend on groceries fluctuates but considering how little we eat out now, I’m not as overly concerned in this area. I don’t buy organic either. It just isn’t something I have figured out yet. But a great tip for clean produce is soaking them in vinegar and water to get any gross stuff off. We are fortunate that we don’t have any food allergies so there isn’t anything we have to avoid.

Having A Depression Era Pantry: I’m still working on this and it’s a fun project! During the depression many mamas were able to still feed their family nutritious, filling meals with very simple ingredients. I’m trying to stock my pantry with simple staples such as rice, flour, oats, dried beans and basic canned goods. Then I try to challenge myself to make simple meals using simple ingredients. This often leads to healthier eating!

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DIY: We make most of the decor in our home and we keep it simple. A year or so ago, I went a little crazy at Michael’s craft store, setting up my craft supply. I try to make cards because already made cards are stupid expensive. I love Home Sense with all the beautiful decorations but I can’t justify paying their prices when I know we could probably make it ourselves. Thrift stores are great places to find jars, old picture frames and other items to repurpose.

Buying second-hand and using cloth diapers are great ways to save money.

Here I talk about buying second-hand clothing. Here I talk about cloth diapering.

Having one car has been a huge money saver for us. It fits our family and works for us right now. It’s not always easy and I stay home a lot but we don’t need two cars at this time in our life. We can’t justifty the extra cost.

Practicing frugality is actually very easy once you establish good habits! But it takes hard work to live a simple life in today’s materialistic world. We want convenience but you know what is inconvenient? Debt! We don’t have it all figured out and it’s not always fun to say no to things we want. But it is worth it to be responsible to our financial obligations and build good monetary habits. It’s also brought an openness in our marriage and we spend more quality time together.

Whatever your situation, don’t be afraid to try new things! Do you enjoy finding ways to save money? What are some things you do to practice frugal living? I’d love to hear from you in the comments section below!